HOW HORSE SEE

HORSE FIELD VISION

 

The way horses see the world is almost entirely differently to that of humans — from the distances they can see, to the colours they can process.

It is an essential element to understand the behaviour of horses when
resting in a stable, practising in a riding arena, facing an obstacle, on a racing track or while trying to load /unload off a horse trailer and traveling in isolation for several hours.

APPROACHING OBSTACLE

During the approach of an obstacle the horse raise their heads. They do that to get better binocular vision and orientate themselves on what exact height and width the obstacle is (using both eyes). When the horse is about to jump, he can no longer see the obstacle and can rely only on the things he memorised while looking at it from a distance – so in fact, he jumps blind.

DRESSAGE

The horse has his head placed vertically against the ground and he may not see what is in front of him, and only what is below his nose. The animal, walking “on a bit” has to rely on the rider and direction he or she chooses.

What Human See

What Horse See

Perception

COLOUR

VISION AT NIGHT

Research has shown that horses see at least two times better at night than people – it is probably due to increased alertness, so they can protect themselves from predators during night grazing.

Horses can endure intense light, so they are not blinded by the sunlight, however, they don’t have the ability to adjust their eyes to darkness quickly, which is why they will often refuse to enter a dark float or stable and have difficulties jumping over obstacles that is on the border of light and shadow.

CONNECT

CONTACT US

(03) 9315 1377

 

info@sonaray.com.au

Unit 7, 21 Westside Drive, Laverton North, VIC. 3026 Australia